Feeling Overwhelmed? You're Not Alone.

 Artwork by Jim Houser. Photo by Luna Park.

Artwork by Jim Houser. Photo by Luna Park.

It's been fascinating see how the meaning of certain Art in Ad Places posters has changed. When we first received this piece from Jim Houser, it felt very personal, an image to meditate on privately, even if you found it in a public place. As for now... let's let Jim weigh in on that:

When RJ asked me to contribute, I felt like it was an interesting opportunity to share some work outdoors. I don’t often make things specifically designed to be shared on the street. I thought it would be good to use something that was simple and subdued, not as text heavy and bright as much of my work usually is. The idea behind the piece was originally meant for a skateboard graphic, but I felt it would be better served in this context. It’s meant to evoke the feeling of being overwhelmed, which is fitting in the climate we now find ourselves living our lives.

On another note, look closely in the photo above. You can catch a glimpse of Luna Park, the photographer who has been documenting every Art in Ad Places installation. Sometimes, these posters last weeks. Other times, just days. And they're all over New York City. That makes documentation almost as important as the physical installation. If you happen to come across an Art in Ad Places installation in person, we hope snap a photo and post it on Instagram or send it to us. We love seeing how each poster is holding up and how people are responding to them. With your permission, we might even reshare your pic.

 Artwork by Jim Houser. Photo by RJ Rushmore.

Artwork by Jim Houser. Photo by RJ Rushmore.