Subvert The City

 Jon Burgerman. Photo by Luna Park.

Jon Burgerman. Photo by Luna Park.

This weekend, anti-advertising activists around the world came together for the second annual Subvert The City, a weekend of action to reclaim public space organized by Subvertisers International. So, we thought we'd join in the fun with a series of installs.

 Special Patrol Group. Photo by Luna Park.

Special Patrol Group. Photo by Luna Park.

Our friends at Special Patrol Group sent us two designs. The READ ME poster pretty succinctly sums up SPG's position on outdoor advertising, and ours as well: Get rid of it. And their #Justice4Grenfell poster is a reminder that the UK government continues to neglect the victims of the Grenfell Tower fire, and the response would likely be the same if a similar tragedy occurred in this country.

 Special Patrol Group. Photo by Luna Park.

Special Patrol Group. Photo by Luna Park.

We also had a few spare posters from last year, and this seemed like the perfect time to finally get those installed: One previously unused poster from Jon Burgerman (at the top of this post), and spare prints of posters by Jess X. Snow, Molly Crabapple, and Sheryo & The Yok.

  Our Ancestors Dreamed of Us  by Jess X. Snow, in collaboration with Jordan Alam. Photo by Luna Park.

Our Ancestors Dreamed of Us by Jess X. Snow, in collaboration with Jordan Alam. Photo by Luna Park.

 Molly Crabapple. Photo by Luna Park.

Molly Crabapple. Photo by Luna Park.

 Sheryo and The Yok. Photo by Luna Park.

Sheryo and The Yok. Photo by Luna Park.

PS, be on the lookout for more Art in Ad Places installations, with new work, soon.

Art in Ad Places at LUCAS LUCAS

 Photo by Luna Park.

Photo by Luna Park.

Thanks to everyone who came through the Art in Ad Places show at LUCAS LUCAS this past week. It closed last night, but the love that everyone who visited showed was amazing, and it was the perfect opportunity to exhibit Luna Park's photos and launch the Art in Ad Places book.

And thanks to André Smith for assistant curating and Jordan Seiler for loaning us a real New York City payphone!

Here are a few photos in case you couldn't stop by.

 Photo by Luna Park

Photo by Luna Park

 Photo by Luna Park.

Photo by Luna Park.

 Photo by Luna Park

Photo by Luna Park

Let's Celebrate: An Exhibition, A Book, and More

aiap-ll-flyer.jpg

And you thought Art in Ad Places was over! We still have a few surprises left.

On January 26th, find us at LUCAS LUCAS in Williamsburg for an Art in Ad Places exhibition, and the launch of a book celebrating all of our ad takeovers to date. We'll have photos from Luna Park, books, a special installation with the help of fellow ad takeover activist Jordan Seiler, and drinks from Ilegal Mezcal.

We open at 7pm. See you there.

And if you can't make it to the opening, the show will be open through February 3rd.

The End, or a Next Step?

 Artwork by Faust. Photo by Luna Park.

Artwork by Faust. Photo by Luna Park.

Surprise! We've got one special bonus installation left before the new year. We cannot think of a message we'd rather be ending on than this piece by Faust, based on an Oscar Wilde quote.

Faust said, "Although this work represents the end of the Art in Ad Places campaign, I wanted share a message of resilience and optimism for the future."

Resilience and optimism. That's really the note to go out on. This is the end of a campaign, but not the end of our work. We don't know what 2018 will look like. We don't know what outdoor advertising is going to look like, or how we can disrupt it given the shift towards digital displays. So we’re going to take a breather and rest for a moment on this high note, because 2017 was a bit of a marathon. No more weekly updates.

The future is a chance for Art in Ad Places to evolve and take a more thoughtful approach. Maybe we’ll try out some bus shelters, or we’ll start reaching out to poets and scientists and game designers and neighbors to see what they want to put in place of ads. Maybe we’ll finally run a few workshops to train a new generation of ad takeover activists. If you have ideas, we’re all ears.

Faust's work marks the end of a campaign, but things are not yet fine. There's more to be done. And besides, fucking with the advertisers feels too damn good.